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قراءة كتاب The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 04 Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. in Twenty Volumes

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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 04
Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. in Twenty Volumes

The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 04 Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. in Twenty Volumes

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. IV, by Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

Title: The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. IV Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. In Twenty Volumes.

Author: Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

Release Date: April 16, 2004 [EBook #12060]

Language: English

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GERMAN CLASSICS, IV. ***

Produced by Stan Goodman, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders

#THE GERMAN CLASSICS#

Masterpieces of German Literature

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH

IN TWENTY VOLUMES

ILLUSTRATED

1914

VOLUME IV

* * * * *

CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV

JEAN PAUL

The Life of Jean Paul. By Benjamin W. Wells.

Quintus Fixlein's Wedding. Translated by Thomas Carlyle.

Rome. Translated by C. T. Brooks.

The Opening of the Will. Translated by Frances H. King.

WILHELM VON HUMBOLDT

Schiller and the Process of His Intellectual Development. Translated by Frances H. King.

The Early Romantic School. By James Taft Hatfield.

AUGUST WILHELM SCHLEGEL

Lectures on Dramatic Art. Translated by John Black.

FRIEDRICH SCHLEGEL

Introduction to Lucinda. By Calvin Thomas.

Lucinda. Translated by Paul Bernard Thomas.

Aphorisms. Translated by Louis H. Gray.

NOVALIS (FRIEDRICH VON HARDENBERG)

The Story of Hyacinth and Roseblossom. Translated by Lillie Winter.

Aphorisms. Translated by Frederic H. Hedge.

Hymn to Night. Translated by Paul Bernard Thomas.

  Though None Thy Name Should Cherish. Translated by Charles Wharton
    Stork.

To the Virgin. Translated by Charles Wharton Stork.

FRIEDRICH HÖLDERLIN

Hyperion's Song of Fate. Translated by Charles Wharton Stork.

Evening Phantasie. Translated by Charles Wharton Stork.

LUDWIG TIECK

Puss in Boots. Translated by Lillie Winter.

Fair Eckbert. Translated by Paul Bernard Thomas.

The Elves. Translated by Frederic H. Hedge.

HEINRICH VON KLEIST

The Life of Heinrich von Kleist. By John S. Nollen.

Michael Kohlhaas. Translated by Frances H. King.

The Prince of Homburg. Translated by Hermann Hagedorn.

ILLUSTRATIONS—VOLUME IV

Lonely Ride. By Hans Thoma.

Jean Paul. By E. Hader.

Bridal Procession. By Ludwig Richter.

Wilhelm von Humboldt. By Franz Krüger.

The University of Berlin.

A Hermit watering Horses. By Moritz von Schwind.

A Wanderer looks into a Landscape. By Moritz von Schwind.

The Chapel in the Forest. By Moritz von Schwind.

August Wilhelm Schlegel.

Caroline Schlegel.

Friedrich Schlegel. By E. Hader.

The Creation. By Moritz von Schwind.

Novalis. By Eduard Eichens.

The Queen of Night. By Moritz von Schwind.

Friedrich Hölderlin. By E. Hader.

Ludwig Tieck. By Vogel von Vogelstein.

Puss in Boots. By Moritz von Schwind.

Dance of the Elves. By Moritz von Schwind.

Heinrich von Kleist.

  Sarcophagus of Queen Louise in the Mausoleum at Charlottenburg. By
    Christian Rauch.

The Royal Castle at Berlin.

Statue of the Great Elector. By Andreas Schlüter.

EDITOR'S NOTE

From this volume on, an attempt will be made to bring out, in the illustrations, certain broad tendencies of German painting in the nineteenth century, parallel to the literary development here represented. There will be few direct illustrations of the subject matter of the text. Instead, each volume will be dominated, as far as possible, by a master, or a group of masters, whose works offer an artistic analogy to the character and spirit of the works of literature contained in it. Volumes IV and V, for instance, being devoted to German Romantic literature of the early nineteenth century, will present at the same time selections from the work of two of the foremost Romantic painters of Germany: Moritz von Schwind and Ludwig Richter. It is hoped that in this way THE GERMAN CLASSICS OF THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES will shed a not unwelcome side-light upon the development of modern German art.

KUNO FRANCKE.

JEAN PAUL

* * * * *

THE LIFE OF JEAN PAUL

By BENJAMIN W. WELLS, Ph.D.

Author of Modern German Literature.

"The Spring and I came into the world together," Jean Paul liked to tell his friends when in later days of comfort and fame he looked back on his early years. He was, in fact, born on the first day (March 21) and at almost the first hour of the Spring of 1763 at Wunsiedel in the Fichtelgebirge, the very heart of Germany. The boy was christened Johann Paul Friedrich Richter. His parents called him Fritz. It was not till 1793 that, with a thought of Jean Jacques Rousseau, he called himself Jean Paul.

Place and time are alike significant in his birth. Wunsiedel was a typical German hill village; the ancestry, as far back as we can trace it, was typically German, as untouched as Wunsiedel itself, by any breath of cosmopolitan life. It meant much that the child who was in later life to interpret most intimately the spirit of the German people through the days of the French Revolution, of the Napoleonic tyranny and of the War of Liberation, who was to be a bond between the old literature and the new, beside, yet independent of, the men of Weimar, should have such heredity and such environment. Richter's grandfather had held worthily minor offices in the church, his father had followed in his churchly steps with especial leaning to music; his maternal grandfather was a well-to-do clothmaker in the near-by town of Hof, his mother a long-suffering housewife. It was well that Fritz brought sunshine with him into the world; for his temperament was his sole patrimony and for many years his chief dependence. He was the eldest of seven children. None, save he, passed unscathed through the privations and trials of

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