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قراءة كتاب The Laws of Candy Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10)

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The Laws of Candy
Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10)

The Laws of Candy Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10)

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دار النشر: Project Gutenberg
الصفحة رقم: 6

do--
You, tell him, if he have ought with us, let him
Look lower, and give it in Petition.

Mochingo

Mighty Magnifico, my Mistris bid me tell you,
If you have ought with her, you must look lower,
And yield it in Petition.

Gonzalo

Here is for thee a Ducket.

Mochingo

You say well Sir, take your own course.

Gonzalo

I will not grace you
(Lady) so much as take you by the hand;
But when I shall vouchsafe to touch your lip,
It shall be through your Court a holy-day
Proclaimed for so high favour.

Erota

This is some
Great mans Jester: Sirrah, begon, here is
No place to fool in.

Gonzalo

Where are the fools you talk of?
I do keep two.

Erota

No question of it: for
In your self you do maintain an hundred.

Gonzalo

And besides them I keep a noble train,
Statists, and men of aclion: my purse is large and deep,
Beyond the reach of riot to draw drie:
Fortune did vie with Nature, to bestow
(When I was born) her bountie equally:
'Tis not amiss you turn your eyes from me;
For should you stand and gaze me in the face,
You perish would, like Semele by Jove:
In Venice at this instant there do lye
No less than threescore Ladies in their graves,
And in their Beds five hundred for my love.

Mochingo

You lie more than they; yet it becomes him bravel[y];
Would I could walk and talk so! I'le endeavour it.

Erota

Sir, do you know me?


Gonzalo

Yes, you were sister to the late Prince of Candy,
Aunt to this young one: and I in Venice,
Am born a Lord; equall to you in fortunes,
In shape; I'le say no more, but view.

Mochingo

There needs no more be said, were I a woman--
O he does rarely: in shape; I'le say no more,
But view: who could say more, who better?
Man is no man, nor woman woman is,
Unless they have a pride like one of these.
How poor the Prince of Cyprus shews to him!
How poor another Lady unto her!
Carriage and State makes us seem demi-gods,
Humility, like beasts, worms of the Earth.

Enter Antinous, and Decius.

Antinous

Royal Lady, I kiss your hand.

Erota

Sir, I know you not.

Annophel

O my noble Brother, welcom from the wars.

Antinous

Dear Sister.

Annophel

Where is my Father, that you come without him?
We have news of your success: he has his health I hope?

Antinous

Yes Sister, he has his health, but is not well.

Annophel

How not well? what Riddles do yo[u] utter?

Antinous

I'le tell you more in private.

Gonzalo

Noble Sir,
I cannot be unmindfull of your merit,
Since I last heard it: you are a hopefull youth,
And (indeed) the Soul of Candy.
I must speak my thoughts.

Annophel

The Prince of Cyprus Brother, good Decius.

Antinous

I am his Servant.

Philander

You are the Patron of your Countrie, Sir,
So your unimitable deeds proclaim you,
It is no language of my own, but all mens.

Gonzalo

Your Enemies must needs acknowledge it:
Then do not think it flatterie in your friends,
For if they had a heart, they could not want a tongue.

Erota

Is this your Brother Annophil?

Annophel

Yes Madam.

Erota

Your name's Antinous?


Antinous

I am (Lady) that most unfortunate man.

Erota

How unfortunate? are you not the Souldier,
The Captain of those Captains, that did bring
Conquest and Victory home along with you?

Antinous

I had some share in't; but was the least
Of the least worthy.

Gonzalo

O Sir, in your modesty you'ld make
A double Conquest: I was an ear-witness
When this young man spoke lesser than he acted,
And had the Souldiers voice to help him out:
But that the Law compell'd him for his honour,
To inforce him make a claim for his reward,
I well perceive he would have stood the man
That he does now, buried his worth in silence.

Erota

Sir, I hearken not to him, but look on you,
And find more in you than he can relate:
You shall attend on me.

Antinous

Madam, your pardon.

Erota

Deny it not Sir, for it is more honour
Than you have gotten i'th' field: for know you shall,
Upon Erota's asking, serve Erota.

Antinous

I may want answers, Lady,
But never want a will to do you service.
I came here to my Sister, to take leave,
Having enjoyn'd my self to banishment,
For some cause that hereafter you may hear,
And wish with me I had not the occasion.

Annophel

There shall be no occasion to divide us:
Dear Madam for my sake use your power,
Even for the service that he ought to owe,
Must, and does owe to you, his friends, and country.

Erota

Upon your Loyalty to the state and me,
I do command you Sir, not depart Candy:
Am I not your Princess?

Antinous

You are a great Lady.

Erota

Then shew your self a Servant and a Subject.

Antinous

I am your vassal.

Mochingo

You are a Coward; I that dare not fight,
Scorn to be vassail to any Prince in Europe:
Great is my heart with pride, which I'le encrease
When they are gone, with practise on my Vassals.

Attendants

The noble Cassilane is come to see you Madam.

Decius

There's comfort in those words, Antinous:
For here's the place, and persons that have power,
To reconcile you to his love again.

Antinous

That were a fortunate meeting.

Enter Cassilane, and Arcanes.

Cassilanes

Greatness still wait you Lady.

Erota

Good Cassilane, we do maintain our greatness,
Through your valour.

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