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قراءة كتاب Graham's Magazine, Vol. XXXII No. 4, April 1848

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Graham's Magazine, Vol. XXXII No. 4, April 1848

Graham's Magazine, Vol. XXXII No. 4, April 1848

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دار النشر: Project Gutenberg
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GRAHAM'S MAGAZINE.



Vol. XXXII.          PHILADELPHIA,  APRIL,  1848.         No. 4.




TABLE OF CONTENTS


JACOB JONES. 193
   
THE DARLING. 197
   
BATTLE OF FORT MOULTRIE. 198
   
THE POET'S LOVE. 200
   
MARY WARNER. 201
   
TO THE AUTHOR OF "THE RAVEN". 203
   
SONG OF THE ELVES. 203
   
THE FIRE OF DRIFT-WOOD. 204
   
SONG FOR A SABBATH MORNING. 204
   
CITY LIFE. 204
   
THE CRUISE OF THE GENTILE. 205
   
ILENOVAR. 218
   
THE LAST OF HIS RACE. 220
   
DECAY AND ROME. 220
   
THE LITTLE CAP-MAKER. 221
   
NO, NOT FORGOTTEN. 228
   
PAULINE GREY. 229
   
THE SAILOR-LOVER TO HIS MISTRESS. 233
   
THE PORTRAIT OF GEN. SCOTT. 234
   
O, SCORN NOT THY BROTHER. 235
   
BEN BOLT. 236
   
THE SPIRIT OF SONG. 238
   
A PARTING. 238
   
REVIEW OF NEW BOOKS. 239





JACOB JONES.

OR THE MAN WHO COULDN'T GET ALONG IN THE WORLD.


BY T. S. ARTHUR.

Jacob Jones was clerk in a commission store at a salary of five hundred dollars a year. He was just twenty-two, and had been receiving this salary for two years. Jacob had no one to care for but himself; but, somehow or other, it happened that he did not lay up any money, but, instead, usually had from fifty to one hundred dollars standing against him on the books of his tailors.

"How much money have you laid by, Jacob?" said one day the merchant who employed him. This question came upon Jacob rather suddenly; and coming from the source that it did, was not an agreeable one—for the merchant was a very careful and economical man.

"I havn't laid by any thing yet," replied Jacob, with a slight air of embarrassment.

"You havn't!" said the merchant, in surprise. "Why what have you done with your money?"

"I've spent it, somehow or other."

"It must have been somehow or other, I should think, or somehow else," returned the employer, half seriously, and half playfully. "But really, Jacob, you are a very thoughtless young man to waste your money."

"I don't think I waste my money," said Jacob.

"What, then, have you done with it?" asked the merchant.

"It costs me the whole amount of my salary to live."

The merchant shook his

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