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قراءة كتاب Notes and Queries, Number 85, June 14, 1851 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

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Notes and Queries, Number 85, June 14, 1851
A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

Notes and Queries, Number 85, June 14, 1851 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

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دار النشر: Project Gutenberg
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tells us, that Phillip, Archduke of Austria, and King of Castile, with his queen Juana, or Joanna, were driven by weather into the port of Weymouth: and that Sir Thomas Trenchard, then the High Sheriff of the county, invited their majesties to his house, and afforded them entertainment that was no less gratifying than timely.

Woolverton now belongs to James Henning, Esq. There is some fine carving in the house, though it is not the ceiling that is markworthy; and it is thought by some to be the work of a foreign hand. At Woolverton House were founded the high fortunes of the House of Bedford. Sir Thomas Trenchard, feeling the need of an interpreter with their Spanish Majesties, happily bethought himself of a John Russell, Esq., of Berwick, who had lived some years in Spain, and spoke Castilian; and invited him, as a Spanish-English mouth, to his house: and it is said he accompanied the king and queen to London, where he was recommended to the favour of Hen. VII.; and after rising to high office, received from Hen. VIII. a share of the monastic lands.

See Hutchins's History of Dorset.

W. BARNES.

Dorchester.

"Felix quem faciunt," &c. (Vol. iii., pp. 373. 431.).

—The passage cited by C. H. P. as assigned to Plautus, and which he says he cannot find in that author, occurs in one of the interpolated scenes in the Mercator, which are placed in some of the old editions between the 5th and 6th Scenes of Act IV. In the edition by Pareus, printed at Neustadt (Neapolis Nemetum) in 1619, 4to., it stands thus:

"Verum id dictum est: Feliciter is sapit, qui periculo alieno sapit."

I was wrong in attributing it to Plautus, and should rather have called it Plautine. By a strange slip of the pen or the press, periculum is put instead of periculo in my note. Niebuhr has a very interesting essay on the interpolated scenes in Plautus, in the first volume of his Kleine Historische und Philologische Schriften, which will show why these scenes and passages, marked as supposititious in some editions, are now omitted. It appears that they were made in the fifteenth century by Hermolaus Barbarus. See a letter from him to the Bishop of Segni, in Angeli Politiani Epistolæ, lib. xii. epist. 25.

To the parallel thoughts already cited may be added the following:

"Ii qui sciunt, quid aliis acciderit, facile ex aliorum eventu, suis rationibus possunt providere."

Rhetoric. ad Herennium, L. 4. c. 9.

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