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قراءة كتاب A History, of the War of 1812-15 Between The United States and Great Britain

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A History, of the War of 1812-15 Between The United States and Great Britain

A History, of the War of 1812-15 Between The United States and Great Britain

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دار النشر: Project Gutenberg
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href="@public@vhost@g@gutenberg@html@files@49393@[email protected]#link159" class="pginternal" tag="{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}a">159.—Cost of the Campaign,
160.—Effects on the Niagara Frontier, 161.—Capture of Fort Niagara,
163.—Destruction of Buffalo and other Villages, 166.

CHAPTER X.
War in the South, 168.—Engagement at Lewistown, 168.—Fight in Delaware
Bay, 169.—Burning of Havre de Grace, Georgetown, and Fredericktown,
171.—Battle at Craney Island, 172.—Destruction of Hampton,
176.—Troubles with the Southern Indians, 178.—Fight at Burnt
Corn Creek, 179.—Massacre at Fort Mims, 182.—Jackson's Campaign,
183.—Fights at Tallus-chatches, Talladega, the Hillabee Towns, Autosse,
and Econochaca, 183.—Dale's Canoe Fight, 188.

CHAPTER XI.
Naval Battles of 1813, 195.—The Hornet and the Peacock, 195.—The
Chesapeake and the Shannon, 197.—The Argus and the Pelican,
201.—The Enterprise and the Boxer, 202.—Decatur Blockaded at New
London, 204.—A New Embargo, 206.

CHAPTER XII.
Privateers, 207.—Their Number and Importance, 207.—Jefferson's Opinion
of them, 208.—A London Journal's Prediction, 211.—Some of their
Captures, and some of their Battles, 212.—The Yankee's Laughable
Exploit, 222.

CHAPTER XIII.
Peace Negotiations, 223.—Campaign against the Creeks, 223.—Condition
of Affairs at the Opening of the Third Year, 223.—Congressional
Appropriations, 224—Russian Offers of Mediation, 225.—Jackson's
Preparations, 227.—Battles of Emucfau, Enotachopco, and Horseshoe Bend, 227.






A HISTORY OF THE WAR OF 1812-15.








CHAPTER I.—CAUSES OF THE WAR.

Franklin's Prediction—British Feeling toward the United States—The Unsurrendered Posts—Indian Troubles—Impressment of Seamen—The Decrees and Orders in Council—Declaration of War.

The offender, says an Italian proverb, never forgives; and it is a singular fact that the deepest resentments and the most implacable hatreds are not those arising from a sense of injuries received, but from injuries inflicted. The victim of a deliberate wrong seldom treasures up a purpose of revenge, or demands anything more than a restoration of his rights; but the oppressor always hates those who have escaped from his oppression.

That wise old philosopher, Ben Franklin, who died within seven years after the acknowledgment

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